Part II: What Differentiates the DiversityInc Top 10 From the Rest of the Top 50 in One Chart

June 13, 2017 10:00 am

This is the second article in a three-part series.

Part II: What Differentiates the DiversityInc Top 10 From the Rest of the Top 50 in One Chart

In the first article of this series, we saw how the Top 10 is significantly outperforming companies ranked 11-50 in Talent Pipeline. The Top 10 outperformed companies ranked 11-50 in representation of Blacks, Latinos, Asians and women in the workforce, management and 10 percent highest paid.

Having a strong, diverse pipeline is critical, but retaining that pipeline is even more important. One way to ensure you keep your diverse pipeline in tact is to develop it. Talent Development is an area in the Top 50 survey in which we measure best practices such as mentoring and employee resource groups (ERGs), along with promotions into and throughout management.

On average, the Top 10 ranked 32.6 spots higher in Talent Development than companies ranked 11-50. The Top 10 promoted 25.4 percent more Black, Latino and Asian managers and 14 percent more women managers than companies ranked 11-50.

One explanation for why the Top 10 is able to promote more Black, Latino, Asian and women managers than other companies lies in their robust approach to mentoring. The Top 10 has over 50 percent more managers participate in its mentoring programs than companies ranked 11-50. Over the years, DiversityInc Top 50 data has consistently shown that companies with higher management participation rates in mentoring outperform others in promotions of Black, Latino, Asian and women managers.

To make their mentoring programs effective, the Top 10 mandate high participation from the top 3 management levels of the organization, including the executive diversity council. To put it plainly, it has to start at the top. If there isn’t strong mentoring participation from the executive diversity council, the body that sets D&I strategy and holds people accountable for results, others in the organization won’t take the mentoring programs seriously and mentoring will be ineffective. On average, the Top 10 has 48 percent more of its executive diversity council participate in mentoring than companies ranked 11-50.

The same concept applies to managers in the top 3 levels. The Top 10 has 40 percent more managers in the top 3 levels participating in mentoring than companies ranked 11-50. If senior leaders they aren’t visible in mentoring, others won’t think the programs are effective and worthwhile. The Top 10 knows this very well, and that is why 7 of the Top 15 companies for mentoring are in the Top 10.

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